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THE PARISH OF OUR LADY AND ST. PATRICK’S
THIS WEEK'S SERVICES

ELEVENTH SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME

JUNE 16TH - 22ND
2024


WEEKLY SERVICES
SUNDAY: 10.00am.  12.30pm (Polish Mass)
6.00pm
MONDAY: 12 noon Mass
TUESDAY: 10.00am Mass
There’s a Deanery Conference that day
WEDNESDAY:
12 noon Mass
THURSDAY: 12 noon Mass
FRIDAY: 12 noon Mass
SATURDAY:
12 noon Mass

LIVESTREAMING THIS WEEK

From now on we will be using Twitter to provide online Masses. Either download the Twitter App and search for @PhilipSumner13 or click the pic below

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Then either just watch from there. You can also click Follow if you have a Twitter account.

Weekday Masses and Saturday's 12 noon Mass will continue to be Livestreamed, as will Sunday's 10.00am Mass

Click here for Mass Livestream

The church will normally be open on Mondays to Saturdays from 10.00am for private prayer

Confessions
each Saturday 11.00am-11.50am

Baptisms & Weddings
by arrangement

ELEVENTH SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME
(YEAR B)
WEEK: JUNE 16TH - 22ND 2024 

11th Sunday of Ordinary time

“It grows into the biggest shrub of all…so that the birds of the air can shelter in its shade.”

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YOUR  CHARITABLE  PRAYERS are requested for our parishioners and friends, especially those whose names appear below.
SICK: Vivien Higgins; John and Kath Green, Angela Marshall, Joseph McConnon, Joan Killeen, Eileen Killeen, Therese Passenger, Cyril and Christine Clarke, Nell Eaton, Linda Taylor, Marie Gill, Pat McQuillan, Kathleen Kelly, Irene Cooper, Denis O’Grady. Deana Dobson, Tony Kenny, Luke Burke, Nora Hickey, Denis Guilfoyle, Amy Howard, Dominic Boardman, Joan Healy, Veronica Lees, Debbie Osborne Walker, Alex Standring and Janice Kopacz Standring, Barry Reid, Peter Barlow, Elizabeth Flanagan, Mary Kain, Rita Goodier, Beatrice Tucker. Janet Butterworth, Connie Marrone, Pauline Howarth, Fr. Derek Woodhead, Kathleen Lomas
LATELY DEAD: Ronnie Peace, Phil White, Sylva O’Garcia
ANNIVERSARIES: Alan Redvers Whitehead, John Cartmell, Raymond Wood, John O’Brien, Des Tickle, Fermina Moniza

LAST WEEK'S COLLECTION: £902.97p

Standing Order: £674.00 a month

CHURCH BOXES / DONATIONS
Caritas (Homeless) £20.00
Many thanks for your kind generosity.

Our Bank: Barclays Bank - Account Name: TSDT, Our Lady and St. Patrick’s, Oldham;   Sort Code 20 55 34;   Account Number 90652504;  Reference: Contr.
Please note that the bank account has changed because a fault was recurring in the old account which meant that direct debits from other companies were sometimes being set up without my authorisation. Thankfully, we noticed each attempt to do so and stopped the payments. The bank has suggested we should have a new account. If you already pay directly into the old account, don’t worry; we will keep both accounts going for a while and simply transfer everything to the new account over time.


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THIS SUNDAY'S MISSALETTE

11th Sunday of Ordinary Time - Missalette


NOTICES:
All Masses will continue to be live streamed. A link is provided on the Parish website: www.smwsp.org.uk or via the Twitter App (@PhilipSumner13). 

POPE FRANCIS’ MONTHLY PRAYER INTENTION THIS JUNE IS FOR “THOSE FLEEING THEIR OWN COUNTRIES
According to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), in 2023, there were 110 million people forcefully displaced from their homes throughout the world.
In this context, Pope Francis has repeatedly asked that migrants be ‘accompanied’, integrated and their cause be promoted.
The Pope says, “The feeling of uprootedness or not knowing where they belong often accompanies the trauma experienced by people who are forced to flee their homeland because of war or poverty.” The Pope asks for our prayers in this matter.

DIOCESAN WORK TO REDUCE OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT
Schools across the diocese have saved an estimated 150 tonnes of carbon in less than a year as part of our strategy to become net zero by 2038.
Over the past year, our diocesan property team has been working closely with schools to identify ways to realise Bishop John’s vision of sustainability in response to Pope Francis’ environmental teachings. In early 2023, the diocese received in excess of £3 million from a government allocation of an additional Devolved Formula Capital funding to address sustainability and carbon reduction in schools. This vital resource provided a key opportunity to help us on our decarbonisation pathway.  
Since then, almost 70 schools across the diocese have had solar panels installed, a further 20 projects are planned, 4 installations will take place as part of bigger projects such as roof replacements, and 15 schools have opted for alternative sustainability projects, such as LED lighting, window replacements, or insulation upgrades.

SOLAR PANELS ON CHURCH PROPERTY
Our application for solar panels on the roof of the presbytery and for the installation of the necessary equipment to store the energy created, was agreed by the diocesan property committee last week. The diocesan property manager will now contact the contractor to give him the ‘go-ahead’.

SPECIAL DAYS THIS WEEK
Wednesday, 19th June - St. Romuald
Thursday 20th June - St. Alban. He was Britain’s first recorded saint. He died during a persecution that took place in the 3rd century. According to the story, he was a pagan soldier who sheltered a priest and was converted. He dressed as the priest and was executed in his place.
Friday 21st June – St Aloysius Gonzaga. He was born into a noble family in 1568 and entered the Jesuits aged 17. He worked to help the victims of the Roman plague from which he died aged 23.
Saturday 22nd – Ss John Fisher and Thomas More. John Fisher was born in Beverley (Yorkshire) in 1469 and died in London on 22nd June 1535. He was Bishop of Rochester and combined his pastoral ministry with study and writing. Thomas More was born in London on February 7, 1478. His father, Sir John More, was a lawyer and judge who rose to prominence during the reign of Edward IV. Thomas More entered Oxford in 1492, where he would learn Latin, Greek and prepare for his future studies. In 1494, he left Oxford to become a lawyer and he trained in London until 1502 when he was finally approved to begin practice. From 1517 on, Henry VIII took a liking to Thomas More, and gave him posts of ever-increasing responsibility. In 1521, he was knighted and made Under-Treasurer of the Exchequer and then was made Lord Chancellor in 1529. On April 13, 1534, Thomas More was ordered to take an oath, acknowledging Henry’s self-granted annulment from Catherine, and the position of the King as head of the Church. He was unable to take the oath and was locked away in the Tower of London. He was finally condemned to death. He ascended the scaffold on July 6, 1535, joking to his executioners to help him up the scaffold, but that he would see himself down. He then made a final statement, proclaiming that he was “the king’s good servant, but God’s first.”

THIS SUNDAY’S READINGS
We know that we’re meant to be a missionary Church but the fact that Pope Francis’ first major official document was to encourage us to accept that responsibility suggests that he thinks we’re not doing what we’re meant to do. But then, how do we assess how well we are doing in this regard? We might look for moments when we’ve convinced someone to be a Christian. But, I suspect that such moments are not always obvious or are very rare. The Gospel today suggests that usually we simply sow seeds of faith and then the growth takes place imperceptibly. So, more often than not, we’ll not actually know that we’ve played our part to enable faith to come to fruition. Faith is not about being convinced in an argument; it’s something that grows with a whole series of interactions.
It’s the first reading and the second parable in the Gospel that suggest the more common dynamic for the growth of faith. Both refer to a great tree which gives shade and shelter to birds of every kind. There’s a sense, surely, in which this image describes the Church as it should be, giving shade and shelter to people of every nationality, age or social condition. This is not about one individual but about a whole series of relationships.
I remember watching a television programme some time ago, on which someone was being interviewed who’d spent years living on the streets. He wasn’t proclaiming himself to be a Christian, but he was clear in saying that for many homeless people, the Church, in its widest sense, is one of the first places to find genuine support. Now I’m aware, as I say this, of the times that I have turned people away from my door and sometimes being verbally abused for so doing. It’s not always easy to tell when giving money to people will genuinely help them or will simply maintain them in their problems. But I’m also aware of all the organisations like the Salvation Army, or, in Manchester, the Catholic-run Cornerstone or the many Church-run foodbanks which do sterling work, week in and week out. This is about the whole community, in a structured way, giving real witness to the Gospel. I know that this parish gives great support to both the Foodbank and to Cornerstone. Thank you!